Volume 128, Issue 4 p. 455-462
Article

Laryngeal Effects of Antigen Stimulation Challenge with Perennial Allergen Dermatophagoides Pteronyssinus

Patrick M. Reidy MD

Corresponding Author

Patrick M. Reidy MD

Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan

Reprint requests: Patrick M. Reidy, MD, 2289 Oxford, Berkley, MI 48072; e-mail, [email protected].Search for more papers by this author
James P. Dworkin MD

James P. Dworkin MD

Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan

Search for more papers by this author
John H. Krouse MD, PHD

John H. Krouse MD, PHD

Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan

Search for more papers by this author
First published: 17 May 2016
Citations: 8

Presented at the meeting of the American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy Foundation, San Diego, CA, September 20, 2002.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We conducted a pilot study to assess the effects of antigen stimulation on the appearance and function of the larynx.

STUDY DESIGN AND SUBJECTS

The prospective, double-blind, randomized study included 9 adult patients with a skin-prick test positive for Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Subjects were blindly challenged via nebulizer with either an active antigenic suspension or placebo. Baseline and 30-minute evaluations of the larynx were performed. Assessments included subjective voice and video-stroboscopic assessments, acoustic analysis of voice, speech aerodynamic testing, and allergy and voice handicap questionnaires.

RESULTS

Although both inflammation and increased mucus were noted, there were no significant differences between the antigen- and placebo-exposed subjects on any of the measures obtained.

CONCLUSIONS

Our preliminary investigation was not successful in demonstrating a direct causal relationship between antigen exposure and physical or functional changes in the larynx. Future studies will involve modifications to our current methodology, including increasing the concentration of antigen, prolonging the exposure time, and observing for late phase responses.