Volume 139, Issue 1 p. 149-151
Short Scientific Communication

Baseline laryngeal effects among individuals with dust mite allergy

John H. Krouse MD, PhD

Corresponding Author

John H. Krouse MD, PhD

Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI

Corresponding author: John H. Krouse, MD, PhD, Wayne State University, 540 E. Canfield, 5E-UHC, Detroit, MI 48201. E-mail address: [email protected]Search for more papers by this author
James P. Dworkin PhD

James P. Dworkin PhD

Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI

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Michael A. Carron MD

Michael A. Carron MD

Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI

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Robert J. Stachler MD

Robert J. Stachler MD

Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI

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First published: 01 July 2008
Citations: 1

Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological (Triological), Society, San Diego, California, April 26-29, 2007.

Abstract

Objective

To examine baseline effects of perennial allergy on laryngeal appearance, laryngeal function, and perceived vocal handicap among individuals without current allergy or voice symptoms.

Data Sources

This pilot study included 47 adults: 21 with positive and 26 with negative skin test responses for the dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus.

Methods

Subjects were tested for sensitivity to dust mite antigen by prick testing. Laryngeal appearance and function were studied with laryngovideostroboscopy, acoustic and speech aerodynamic analysis, and voice sampling. These parameters were blindly analyzed by three trained examiners. Subjects also completed the Voice Handicap Index (VHI) as a measure of vocal handicap.

Results

Subjects allergic to dust mites perceived significantly greater vocal handicap on the VHI than did nonallergic subjects. No significant differences were noted between groups in laryngeal appearance or function.

Conclusion

These pilot data suggest that, at baseline, allergic individuals perceive greater vocal handicap than their nonallergic counterparts (P = 0.04), even in the absence of current allergy symptoms or observable physical or functional abnormalities. These preliminary observations can serve as an impetus for further research into this important area, including the potential interrelationship between acid reflux disease and allergic laryngeal inflammation.