Volume 152, Issue 6 p. 1089-1093
Otology and Neurotology

Minimally Invasive Surgery for Osseointegrated Auditory Implants

A Comparison of Linear versus Punch Techniques

Steven A. Gordon MPH

Steven A. Gordon MPH

Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia, USA

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Daniel H. Coelho MD

Corresponding Author

Daniel H. Coelho MD

Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia, USA

Daniel H. Coelho, MD, FACS, Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, PO Box 980146, Richmond, VA 23298-0146, USA. Email: [email protected]Search for more papers by this author
First published: 24 February 2015
Citations: 3

Sponsorships or competing interests that may be relevant to content are disclosed at the end of this article.

This article was presented at the 2014 AAO-HNSF Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO; September 21-24, 2014; Orlando, Florida.

Abstract

Objectives

(1) To describe the benefits of the minimally invasive punch technique without soft tissue reduction (PT) for the placement of percutaneous osseointegrated auditory implants. (2) To compare and contrast techniques and outcomes from PT with the linear technique with soft tissue reduction (LT).

Study Design

Case series with chart review

Setting

Performed at a tertiary otology practice at an academic medical center.

Subjects and Methods

LT was used until 2012 when a switch was made for all patients to PT. Preoperative variables recorded included age, sex, BMI, smoking status, indication, device selected, and abutment length. Outcomes measures included surgical time, skin reaction grading by Holgers score at 1 week and at most recent follow-up, and any other complications. Two-sample t test and χ2 was used to compare.

Results

A total of 51 patients (34 LT, 17 PT) were identified. Surgical time was found to be significantly shorter for the PT group (LT, 49.2 min; PT, 13.4 min; P <. 001). There were no statistically significant differences between LT and PT for mean Holgers at first (LT, 0.24; PT, 0.47; P =. 87) or final follow-up (LT, 0.62; PT, 0.41; P =. 22).

Conclusions

The punch technique offers several potential surgical and cosmetic advantages over the linear technique without compromising skin-reactivity outcomes. This study supports a growing trend toward minimally invasive percutaneous auditory implant surgery.